Teaching Styles in Equestrian Coaching
Teaching Styles in Equestrian Coaching
Equestrian Coaches Only! Take a moment to think about this second! You might know what you coach or the reasons you coach but have you thought about what you teach? As a coach you can use a variety of methods of teaching in your classes with your students. You might be familiar using the terms of coaching as well as instructional styles , or facilitative techniques or methods based on the discipline you are in and your training. Many trainers of horses employ a more explicitstyle of teaching in their lessons where coaches give commands or shows and the students follow his instructions. Take the poll here for equestrian coaching styles Think of one of your lessons , where you're teaching: Whole ride, trot and the entire ride continues to trot on, or you say: Everyone, come into this and everyone is brought in together at the specified location. These are the typical situations in which you, as the coach, are making all or almost all of the decisions , and having to take responsibility for the student taking the lessons. For more detail please visit:- https://capquangvnpt24h.com/ piano điện kawai Another similar style of teaching allows the students to be a bit more responsible when making decisions, by practicing for a certain amount of time on their own or working together with a classmate. Does this type of teaching approach sounds familiar? By taking more responsibility and making the choices, students can evaluate their own progress in relation to a set set of standards or decide the level at which they want to take part. If you use terms like Command, Practice, Reciprocalor Self-check or Inclusion when you talk about your teaching style/s when coaching, you're probably using teaching strategies that require learners to reproduce their information, duplicate models, and recall information to practice skills. If, as an example, you're teaching your students brush their horses correctly and pick out their feet in a safe manner and safely, or ride around the showjumping grid a few times the chances are you're using these types of methods to teach. Complete the survey about coaching for horses Other styles of teaching that you may use in your classes will attempt to shift the decision-making burden even further from the coach on the other hand to the pupil. These kinds of styles include Guided Discovery, Convergent Discovery, Divergent Discovery, Learner-Designed Learning-Initiated, Self-Teaching or Learner-Initi the student is most likely to gain new knowledge by themselves. If, for instance, your students are seeking out new strategies to talk to their horse, it is likely you are teaching using these methods. In these essays, the learner is more likely to make decisions and be accountable for their own progress in the lessons. Be mindful when thinking about the style of teaching you're using. Sometimes names are employed in general terms which may not accurately describe what occurs. For example, coaches sometimes mention that they employ Guided Discovery with a group of students. It is more likely Guided Discovery is used as a teaching style with one student rather than in a group. Generally speaking, Guided Discovery calls for the coach to ask a set of questions so that the participant can figure out the answer. It is difficult for every student to attain individual learning at the same pace as the other students working in the group. Based on the way they are learning, some students might be inclined to pose different questions to their peers as they search for the answer. The eleven styles of teaching such as Command Practice, Reciprocal, Inclusion, Self-check Discovery Convergent Discovery, Divergent Discovery, Learner-Designed, Learner Initiated, and Self-Teaching (labelled A-K) can be found on a continuum known as the Spectrum of Teaching Styles. Since there is an endless number of teaching methods These eleven styles are recognized as iconic teaching methods. Fill out the survey for coaches who coach horses here The Spectrum of Teaching Styles, invented by MuskaMosston and then refined in collaborative effort together with Sara Ashworth (2008) is a unified theory about teaching and learning which provides a comprehensive model for understanding the learning process and teaching. The Spectrum is built upon the premise that teaching is a chain of decision-making and that every deliberate action of teaching is the result of a previous choice. Prof. Sara Ashworth describes a teaching style as an action plan which defines the particular relationship between the teacher (or coach] and the student or student for the purpose of helping to lead to the development of specific objectives regarding subject matter and conduct. Many equestrian coaches understand why they coach. And as you become more skilled as a coach you are more aware of the lessons you teach. If you are confident in the content you're teaching your students when you are coaching, you also can think about the way you actually delivering that content for your students during the lessons. As an equestrian trainer, think of how you are teaching at present as well as the range of methods you employ to teach. Consider how well that is working for you. Knowing that there are different methods of teaching that coaches can use is useful information. Using a variety of those methods of teaching can assist coaches in meeting different learning goals that are specified in every lesson. Spend a few minutes reflecting on the issues discussed here. Which are you using in your lessons? See if you can identify which of the different styles from the Spectrum you use. Below is a list of the eleven different teaching styles on the Spectrum below. Be aware that all teaching styles are appropriate. Sometimes you may only use one or two styles and at times, you might incorporate a variety in every lesson. Any particular style or set of styles is more valuable than another , it's all dependent on what you're trying to accomplish. Understanding the Spectrum and becoming acquainted with the distinctions between them will enable you to learn more about yourself as a coach. If you're an equestrian trainer, take this survey Understanding what coaches think about the teaching techniques they use in their lessons is crucial for the future of coach education. The Spectrum offers a thorough systematic, rational and unique method to study teaching and learning that will benefit coaches of equestrians. Cristine Hall from Cristine Hall, from the University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba has designed a short list of questions to fill out a survey that may help you consider that you're using today. Your comments about how you believe you're doing is crucial and can contribute to ongoing research in coaching education. The survey, in addition to seeking some background information, includes only 11 questions. The questions ask how frequently (if at all) you utilize every one of the 11 methods from the Spectrum when you coach. That's only a one click response for each question. You can have it done in less than ten minutes! You might learn more about your own coaching by examining the methods described on the form.

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